Frequently Asked Questions

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Question: Must old floors be sanded or can they be chemically stripped?

 

Full question:

I have recently purchased a house (late Georgian or very early Victorian) with antique pine floors, and I would like to restore and lye wash them. In total I think it is about 140 square metres of flooring. I would like to disrupt the wood as little as possible - is it possible to solvent strip a floor of this size (the area is spread over 8-9 rooms), then do the lye wash treatment, so you retain some of the physical patination, or is the sanding necessary?

Answer:

From your description of the floors I'd be really surprised if stripping the surface would create an evenly open grain to allow a decent job with Lye and White Oils. The result would be browny / grey/ blotchy and old looking - however, this might be exactly what you want from a historic house! Its the sort of work, however, done by yourself or a labourer under your direct control as you wont know in advance what you are going to get or how long it will take.

The correct option is sanding and finishing from a well prepared surface. You may think that this will sterilise the appearance of the floor, but actually the lye / oil system is the one option that avoids this. It would be lacquers that create too perfect a surface. There was a house we worked on a few years ago that followed my recommendation and then had the 'artists' doing the character on window panelling and door architraves to stunning effect. The flat floor was the background to the furniture and finishes and in no way diminished the appearance of the property.

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Question: What is the difference between Master Floor Oil and Diamond Oil?

 

 

First of all, there are differences in the solid matter. That is the mass that is left, when the solvent has evaporated. WOCA Master Floor Oil contain approx. 60% solid matter while it is approx. 91% by the Diamond Oil.

Both Master Floor Oil and Diamond Oil are suitable for professionals and private persons when working with machines, but Diamond Oil shouldnt be applied by hand and any surface more than a few m2. It dries too fast, so most likely you wont be able to wipe away fast enough.

Question: Can I use a supermarket detergent instead of Woca Wood Cleaner?


No, Wood Cleaner has several purposes. Partly, it makes sure that the floor is clean and free from grease. Furthermore, it opens the grains of the wood so that it takes well and gives the floor the correct surface tension, so that lacquers or Lacquer Care will spread evenly. Moreover, it is nice to keep in the kitchen cupboard for the quick spot removing on wooden floors. If you have problems with water stains on an oiled oak wood floor, you can also use the Wood Cleaner for the cleaning. It neutralizes tannin that is on top of the wood. By re-oiling, you might experience that the floor is much more water resistant now. (Please notice that this primarily concerns oak).  

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Question: Is the Worktop Oil FDA-approved?

 

All the used raw materials in the Worktop Oil are FDA approved in the state of saturation.

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Question: My teak furniture has got a silver-grey look, which I like, do they need treatment and will they keep that look?

 

No, not if you treat them with oil. The oil will always awake the glow and darken the wood.

 

But you can omit oiling them and then in return clean them more often with Exterior Cleaner. Then you will have nice silver-coloured furniture, which is not that dirt repellent but then you compensate for that by cleaning them more often.

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Question: Can you maintain Element 7 floors?

 

 

Full question:

In August 2010 you installed us an Element 7 floor, fired oak parquet.

It still looks very nice, but has become slightly dull and I am wondering whether you recommend re-oiling it or whether I should treat it myself with any special products.

Answer:

Element 7 has passed on your enquiry to Dane Care as my team originally did the sanding and oiling of the panel floors. I think you also have board floors, which are also commissioned by us.

Its good to hear the floors are still looking good. The dulling is a consequence of the gradual creep of tannins back to the wood surface where the react with moisture and lighten the wood. There are care products that have a percentage of oil, which can counter this. Often its easier just to reoil and set the floors up for the next 4 years.

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Question: Do you have video resources that demonstrate the various processes of using your products?

 

Yes. When the manufacturer has produced a video then its linked alongside a product’s usage and data sheet. Dane Care uses Vimeo.com to store videos made ourselves. Search Dane Care Ltd to see all of these OR use the links imbedded in instructions.

 

For example https://vimeo.com/78548844 demonstrates mechanical washing of a floor.

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Question: Can you deliver to Germany?

Please contact www.wocashop.de for supply of product in Germany.

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Question: Why is lye not recommended for ceilings?

 

If the ceilings are not installed already, it is not a problem. It is only because the Softwood Lye is a corrosive liquid. And liquids tend to drip down. So there is a risk of getting corrosive liquid on your arms and even worse; in the face and eyes and on the floors below. Therefore, we do not recommend using Softwood Lye on an already installed ceiling. Instead, Panel White, which is paint, is suitable for the lightening of yellowed wood, e.g. ceilings and wall panels.   

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Question: re. Lye products

 

Full Question:

 

I'm laying a pitch pine floor and I'm guessing from the descriptions that I need the special lye. Is that correct? Could you let me know?

 

Answer:

 

Special Lye, Antique Lye and Active Stains are for oak woods, since they react with tannins in the wood. That doesn’t rule out using them on other woods BUT PLEASE DO NOT USE UNLESS YOU HAVE TESTED IT FIRST!!!!!

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Question: Does anyone have any practical experience of the new Exterior oils on Accoya wood?

 

Yes! Please request by email our brochure in the applications of the Woca on Accoya. The information is also attached to Exterior Oil How To links.

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Question: Where do you work?

 

 

Full question:

I’ve a query about the cost of having flooring re oiled. It has been down about 18month-2 years, Jacobean dark oak.Tunbridge postcode. Do you cover this area and cost of doing so, please.

 

Answer:

My chaps operate out of London and travel all over to do this type of work.

Can I ask for a sketch of your floor plan, an idea of the furniture shifting required and also information on the origins of the floor. I  like to identify what finish is on the  wood in advance. Once I have this information then I should be able to give a price.

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Question: We have no heating in our house. Its cold! Can we proceed with floor finishing?

 

The project temperature MUST be lifted to a comfortable level - at least 16 degees  room temperature throughout.

 

The fact is that oil WILL NOT DRY on schedule unless this is done. Unless radiators  are reconnected you really shouldn’t be floor finishing.  This is particularly true of

hardwax oils which could take a week to go off when conditions arent right – that can

be a huge disruption. So if you are in an unresolvable situation then use an impregnating oil

to get treatment and protection in the floor then sort out the full finish once heating is on.

 

This issue does not just cover the floor finish, but also the wood quality will be affected.  Cold equals damp so if you sand and fill the wood THEN heat the room up then the fact is the floor is likely to shrink and gaps reappear.

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Question: Have you looked at my pictures of the lacquered floor? Why is it looking so awful?

 

Certainly the floor in your pictures doesnt look very happy. However, mainly I’m seeing signs of aggressive scratching and scraping across a dirty floor.

 

Some specific points are:

 

1) I would not think there is a single woodfloor finish manufacturer including those making factory applied ceramic lacquers who would be comfortable with that type of narrow, nylon tipped chair on their finish.

 

2) I cant really tell from the picture if the speckled effect is from grit being pressed into the floor surface subsequent to finishing  OR grit that has got into the lacquer product during finishing meaning a drag has pulled the top off it. By running your hand over the finish you should quickly ascertain if your finisher applied the finish with a load of dirt getting caught in it or whether the dirt has been flicked onto the drying finish by a careless passer-by.

 

3) The shooting star effect will be a heavy box being pushed across a dirty area. Its telling that both of these marks are at the floor edge and next to the stone installation.

 

4) The lightness in the grain is fine building dust being mopped around the floor. If its trapped under the finish then …. havent cleaned the floor properly before starting. I doubt that, however.

 

Have a look at some of our lacquer care products and lotions. They may serve to be an easy repair, but most likely the surface needs screening and repair by recoating with the original finish.

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Question: I've a new white oiled floor - how do I look after it?

 

 

Full Question:

I wanted to touch base to ask about the finish on the floors. The gentleman who did the floors informed me on Saturday that I should not wash the floors for 1 week, only vacuum. I love the finish, but my only negative comment on the flooring is that it is very dry, has a chalky feel on your feet, and appears to pick up marks easily. I took a sponge and tried to wipe the floor at the entrance and it doesn't clean up. I thought it would have more of a wax finish making it easier to clean. I knew being that the floor is white that it would require more maintenance as far as cleaning it more often but I expect that it is able to easily wipe off dirt/scuff marks... What is the solution for this?

Answer:

The wood has plenty of a very strong oil in it, but I agree can feel a bit dry at the outset since it has not yet been honed by cleaning and traffic.

The cleaning of this type of floor finish really involves the damp cleaning and soap is an important part of that. If its done every other week then the soap hardens in the surface and you find that the oil converts into a really smooth, hard surface with a slight sheen.

The worst enemy to the finish is over aggressive cleaning - often this is a painter or another tradesman who try and remove some paint or a scuff from a black sole. Its better not to over-rub a spot, rather let the mark break down of its own accord using the general cleaning process. You'll be pleasantly surprised how things just seem to go on their own accord. For example, if your dog has an accident then it may leave a stain, but if you dont try anything too specific then you'll find in a month or two the wood has rejuvenated itself.

 

Question: After tests I’ve chosen to use another of your products and want to return the previous delivery at the same time the new delivery arrives. How do we organise this?

 

 

I am glad to hear that we have found a solution for your floor. You are very welcome to return the unopened container. Please place an order online for the new product and in the transport comments box write a note "collection on delivery please one box" so that I can arrange for your existing to be collected. If you are not going to be home you will need to leave it somewhere safe and put those instructions in the comments box as well. Please put your invoice inside the box you are returning so I can trace who sent it back. Once I have the product back I will send you a refund. There is a charge of about £12 for collection on delivery.

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Question: What is NMP?

 

NMP is a shortening for N-Methylpyrrolidone, which is an organic solvent. EU has recommended that NMP is changed to class T, category 2 because it may harm an unborn child. NMP is absorbed through the skin when the lacquer is wet. Therefore, WoodCare Denmark has among other things decided to produce Wood Floor Lacquer according to EU requirements, which is NMP free.

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Question: We live in a cottage in Cornwall with a floor made of 8" x 20mm pine boards. The room is approximately 9mx5m. There are large gaps between the boards which collect dirt and dust and the colour is dreadful!!! Can you help?

 

My suggestion is a local company sand the floor, fill the gaps with a resin mix (which may or may not stay in place, it depends on how flexible the floor is) and then finishes it using the attached instructions.

 

This would give our light, scandinavian look.

 

Alternatively, this is the sort of work Dane Care can do for you. My men are quite happy to travel and be based close to your project and carry it through, which should give you confidence the result will be as good as it can be. You need to be ready for a high quote, however.

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Question: I have treated my floor with Lacquer Care but there are many stripes and it does not look good. What have I done and what should I do?

 

It is most likely that too much has been used, the Lacquer Care must only be applied in a thin layer, like a kind of polish, consumption: 1 litre/60 m2.

 

Should the result not be satisfactory in first try, the floor can be washed with WOCA Wood Cleaner. Make the solution a bit stronger than normal (1:4-5). For instance, leave it on the floor for 5-10 minutes, rub with mop or cloth and wash with clean water. Now, it is ready for a new treatment.

 

It is a good idea to start wringing the cloth or mop in cold water, so it does not absorb all the Lacquer Care. Spread the care in a thin layer. Same procedure as if you wipe the floor with a wrong cloth.

Gloss

The Lacquer Care with gloss is easier to apply/spread than the mat one, as it does not contain matting agents which can be difficult to spread evenly. When you only apply a very thin layer, you can easily use a Lacquer Care with gloss on a mat floor without it is getting glossy.

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Question: Do you sell Dinesen soap?

 

 

Full Question:

I need couple of 5 l white soap for my Dinesen Douglas fir floor
Can you deliver in SW3?

 

Answer:

We don’t sell the Dinesen soap. They have their own webshop for sales direct from Denmark http://webshop.dinesen.com/gb/   If you struggle with that then we have Faxe soap white available from this website, which we feel is the closest alternative. You can place orders and pay online for next day delivery.

Question: Should I choose a soap or an oil finish?

 

It is an individual choice. The soap treatment is by far the easiest to carry out. You have to wash the floor with a powerful soap solution now and then but it is not more difficult than to wash a floor. On the other hand, it is also the weakest of the 3 solutions as regards dirt repellent and spot cleaning. If you have a large family and perhaps a dog that run in and out of the house, it is not the best solution in the family room.

 

Oil treatment is a bit more demanding. Do you have more than 15m2; we recommend that you rent a polishing machine for the sanding and polishing. On the other hand, the oil is also stronger as regards wearability, and it is more dirt repellent.

 

Both soap- and oil treated floors can be repaired without treating the whole floor. For instance, if you have a hallway with a lot of traffic, you can just give the area an extra layer of Maintenance Oil. Spots and marks are also repairable without sanding the whole floor.

 

If you want to be able to drop a glass of beetroots and leave it on the floor overnight and make sure you are able to clean it all up, you have to choose lacquer. Lacquer requires a completely clean floor and you have to treat the whole floor. It is almost impossible to repair marks or damages; you would have to treat the whole floor.

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Question: re. Maintaining hardwax finished floors

 

 

Full question:

I received your letter re the hardwax finished floors needing their re oiling. Can you please give me more information about this? Do you need all of the furniture out of the house? How long does it take?

 

Answer:

There are 2 ways of maintaining the floor.

1) if the build of hardwax is still intact and the problem is only micro scratching then we shall use a hardwax maintenance oil. It is bad practice to keep applying layers of full weight hardwax oil as it can result in a slippy floor and one where the grain and patina starts to get hidden. Maintenance Oil has a drying time of about 4 hours.

2) if the hardwax has been subject to high wear then we shall apply a new layer of hardwax having primed the floor. That has a drying time of about 10 hours. 

So regardless of the choice, we will have to work over several days and move furniture from side to side. Hardwax needs that drying time and unlike impregnating oil doesn allow furniture to be put on it when its wet. It normally proves impossible to remove furniture from rooms and our way gets round the problem.


It would be a good idea to keep up the amount of oil protection on the floor, since if its allowed to wear through it will be a problem to restore the colour of the underlying surface. In its own way the overall floor will be maturing as it gets older so regular maintenance proves much more efficient than infrequent, but more radical fixing.

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Question: The oil applied to my floor doesnt seem to be drying

 

Full question:

 

My niece urgently needs your help. She has bought Faxe white lye and Woca Wood Oil White from you online together with the special cloths. These have been applied according to the instructions but the oil doesn't seem to be drying. This is urgent as the oil has been applied to the floors of a newly acquired house to which she and her family must move on the weekend. With the floors still tacky they are stuck. The oil was applied 2 days ago and still isn't dry. What should she do? Please give as much advice as you can. If, for example, the oil has been applied too thickly (although her builders say they haven't done this) how can it be removed, cured etc.

 

Answer:

Its worrying as the only reason to get this sort of long drying time is of the oil has been applied as a layer rather than being worked into the surface. Normally the worker should walk away from a damp (almost dry) surface which then wouldn't show a footprint after 6 to 8 hours. 2 days, therefore, is disastrous.

Its painful to say this, but since you ask: To remove it - belt sanding with plenty of paper to use since the belts will get gummed up very quickly.

However, a possible solution to cure it - if its at the point that it can be walked on but is still tacky then I've experience that rubbing it down with patina disks and slightly more oil can crystalise the surface, but that is quite specialist.

Other than that, it's a matter of time. Not wanting to sound miserable but such a mess can take more than 2 days to cure particularly if the heating isnt particularly high.

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Question: I have left oil on the floor overnight, now the floor is sticky, and I cannot remove the excess oil, What do I do?

 

If it is still sticky, you can dissolve it with white spirit and a green polish pad. Wet a cloth with white spirit and wipe it over the floor (only a small area at a time). Then you polish with green pad with the machine till the sticky oil is removed.

If it is a large area or even just a small area, for instance a table, you can start removing most of it with a scraper. Alternatively, you can let it dry completely (it takes a least one week) and then scratch it off (you can also start with the scraper). Now, you have to apply Maintenance Oil or Wood Floor Oil again. Remember to wipe off the excess oil after 15-20 minutes.

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Question: Whats the dilution ratio for white soap?

 

Full Question:

 

What is the dilution ration for Faxe White Soap?

 

Answer:

 

Sorry about all the confusion over the soap. In the end I emailed the manufacturers in Denmark. This is their reply.:

"The ratio would be 1:20, when its regular maintenance.

For basic treatment, the ratio is 1:10.

The surface should be wet, without areas of pools on the floor.

A bucket with 5 litres of soap mixture, could easily cover more than 100

m2. "

 

 So if you buy 1 Litre soap and mix with 10 litres water you will have

enough to do 2 coats on your 50m2 floor.I hope that helps.

 

However, our own contractors still think diluting 1:1 gets the best amount of protection into the wood in the least time, so you can make your own mind up! For that reason all our instructions are written on this basis (1:3 for the 2nd application).

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Question: Little beads of wet oil are popping back from the joints of a recently oiled floor. Whats going on?

 

 

When a floor is oiled the joints will draw it down into themselves through a capillary action. It is then deprived of oxygen and can take some time to cure there. That is all good until one of several things happen: 1) the floor is loose and flexs as someone walks on it – the oil is pumped back out in micro-beads, 2) the floor temperature increases and the oil swells before popping out. This heat rise can be from central heating coming on or the sun passing across the floor.

 

Both of these are unavoidable problems. Simply continue to wipe the oil away until the problem ceases.

 

Question: Which cleaning product should I choose? Natural Soap or Oil Refresher for my oiled floor?

 

 

Both are suited for oiled floors. They are both easy to use and both give the floor protection when you wash it. The Oil Refresher gives the floor a little bit of oil so that you can wait a while until next treatment with Maintenance Oil. Both products are available in natural and white. Some think that the Oil Refresher seems very thin compared to the Natural Soap, but the oil will penetrate into the floor and protect it.

If you have an oak wood floor and you want to keep the white/light look, we recommend our Natural Soap. It will give the lightest result, as the oil gives oak a natural glow.

If you oiled your floor recently, or you wash it several times a week, you must use the Natural Soap. If the floor is fully-saturated with oil, the oil emulsion cannot penetrate into the wood and will stay on the surface. This will appear as a greasy film and foot prints will be visible.

(they can easily be removed by washing one time with clean water or a soap solution).

Use WOCA Natural Soap natural or white for the regular cleaning and then for instance the Oil Refresher once a month. You can switch between natural and white depending on how white you want the floor to be. 

Question: Do you know which floor manufacturer favours which aftercare products?

 

I do try and keep track of this. We're also happy to do research on your behalf and when its impossible to discover the correct specification then a recommendation can be made from the Woca range. Here goes anyway:

Element 7 oiled: use their own brand oil in production then recommend Woca soaps and maintenance oils for aftercare

Dinesen: all wood is shipped unfinished with their own brand lyes, soaps and/or oils. They have their own webshop for aftercare lye and soap to be shipped direct from Denmark. Oil is not available from their webshop, but they have recommended Woca High Solid products in the past.

Timbafloor: recommend Woca for aftercare

Hakwood: their floor finish choice covers UV-lacquered, oiled & duo-varnished. Specific care products are available from Hakwoods.

The Solid Wood Flooring Company: floors are supplied prepared with Timberex impregnating oil. These floors can be cared for using Woca products if you wish for a VOC free care programme.  

Timberland: recommend Woca for aftercare.

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Question: I’m having my floor oiled. How should I set the underfloor heating before an oiling process.

 

 

If the house is cold and the underfloor heating hasn’t been on yet then start low and work up its target temperature daily by 5 degC with the aim of getting the room to 18 degC. Don’t do sudden leaps and don’t aim too high as the floor will have to be hotter to achieve this and cosnequently too hot for the oiling process.

 

Question: Can a floor be finished in one day?

 

 

Full question:

Approx 80% of our work needs to be complete in 1 day. When I read
your application methods it seems most finishes can't be completed in 1 day. What do you recommend?


Answer:

Answering this requires me to turn to practical experience as a contractor rather than what my suppliers say on their instructions!

I'm not convinced that any hardwax oil will do a job in one day even if you buff it into the surface. It will still be sticky after several hours and everything will grind to a halt if you try going back on. I also think that all impregnating oils need 2 or 3 applications to build an even finish that is going to look as good the next morning as it does when you leave the house. So basically you need an impregnating oil that dries immediately so you can quickly get back on for a 2nd go or within a coffee break timeframe.

From the range I have the only one meeting this criteria is Hesse Natural Oil OE-83 with 10% hardener OE87 added. We first used this as contractors in the Pollen Street restaurant in central London. This is a Michelin starred place and they were cheesed off with the hardwax oil they had been sold which was continously walking off in stripes. Our work was done in May last year, we reoiled in August and when I saw it recently with a view to another 6 month maintenance it was looking very satisfactory. That is open access being a restaurant...

If you read the instructions you'll see that is says leave 16 hours between applications! My guys say they could go back on after 30 minutes and its one of those oils you have to work in 15 - 20m2 sections – although there are no overlap marks. I also have put a picture of the restaurant floor during progress. The upper half is the section done on the first stage so shows the finish colour. The lower half is the previous (lovely) hardwax oil! They said the oak didnt go as dark as they are used to with a Woca Oil, but I can say it looks a lot more mature now due to the cleaning wear it has taken in the last 9 months. There are NOT, however, the worn-through areas that cry out dirt/failure/damage which noone wants.

If you do have time on your side then I'd still recommend the Woca Master Floor Oil or High Solid Oil, which is slower drying and so goes deeper in the wood. The Eurostar project is proof of its worth after 6 years. Unfortunately you cant see that floor without buying a ticket to Paris! However, we have just done the same system on the upper level of the viewing platform of London's highest building so for £25 you get to see a beautiful floor and also London.

 

Question: How do the five thousand of so m2 of Jatoba flooring in Eurostar St Pancras get cleaned?

 

The techique was developed by Dane Care based on the initial 3 month care period that we underook before it was handed over to the contract cleaners. Subsequently other commercial floor cleaners have adopted the techique for hotels and restaurants they look after.

 

Woca Commercial Oil 1902 is a deliberately very thin oil to prevent overbuild so needs multiple workings to get the appearance up to a Eurostar presentation. However, if you have a hardwax or lacquer finish then these don’t apply so you need to sand the floors to go to the successful Woca finish.

 

One detail is that Eurostar buy Master Soap and dilute it into their own spray bottles. Most other customers buy Natural Soap Sprayable for the convenience and to negate the risk that their workers get the dilution wrong.

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Question: Can I use lacquers after a lye- treatment?

 

You can do that. But you have to make sure to clean CAREFULLY with Wood Cleaner and wash with clean water to make sure that the surface is no longer basic and with that damage the lacquer.

 

Any lacquer will irreversibly yellow the appearance of the floor so you need to test the system to completion before undertaking it.

 

Finally, you wont know if the adhesion of the lacquer is good for some months after the application. If it fails then you will see flaking and discolouration at which point it becomes inevitable that the floor must be sanded to refinish it correctly.

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Question: Red wine has been spilt on our oil-treated floor, how do I remove the stain?

 

WOCA Spot Remover is perfect for indoor use to remove spots.

 

If necessary, repeat the treatment till the spot is gone. Always remember to finish with WOCA Natural Soap, WOCA Maintenance Oil or WOCA Maintenance Paste.

 

Otherwise, patience is remarkably effective as organic stains have the habit of breaking down in their own way under a normal cleanign regime. So dont overreact and start sanding!

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Question: I have treated a pinewood floor with Softwood Lye, instead of getting lighter, it has turned completely green, like impregnated timber

 

It was probably not newly sanded wood. Already after 3 weeks, the wood starts creating lignin which is what turns yellow. Lye does not lighten up yellowed wood but only matures the wood so it does not turn yellow so fast. If you apply lye to already yellowed woodwork, it will react with the lignin and turns to this ugly green colour.

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Question: Is the Oil Refresher also for soap-treated floors?

 

Yes, by some wood types as for instance oak, where you want it as light as possible. We recommend continuing with Natural Soap white, as the oil in the Oil Refresher will moisten the wood and therefore, the floor will appear darker when treated with oil.

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Question: I'm trying to make a repair with lye - it doesnt seem to be working!

 

Full question:

 

The samples I ordered from you last week were to treat just two short floorboards in a doorway where too much lye had been sanded off by our not so great floor man...  I sanded this area carefully again and then applied the lye.  But - the lye is not working!  Because oil had been applied to this area as well, I thought maybe I hadn't sanded off all the oil.  I started over, sanded even more this time and then applied lye again.

Still, not working.  The wood looks more orange than ever!  I have no idea what I'm doing wrong?

 

Answer:

 

This is a difficult scenario. You need to sand much harder than you may expect as otherwise you simply compress the already oiled wood and set up a barrier to the effect of lye and white oil. After doing that it's also just a question of time. Even a couple of weeks can make a big difference to the way the lye treated surface oxidises. So even with the best work you cant get it exactly right and need to sit back and let  time blend the patch in with the other floor boards in the room.

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Question: The painters have left my floor with fist size scour marks on it. Any ideas?

 

They’ll have splattered some paint and tried to improve the situation  by buffing / scouring the spot. Odds on there will still be a bit of paint in the centre of the scoured area. They should have just let the splatter to dry and then flicked it off using the blade of a Stanley knife. If they had cut the surface slightly then it could have been touched up with some maintenance oil. Now you need to pick the paint out in the manner described and probably soak the spot with some water to open the grain and then reoil the area. If its not a perfect cure then at least the area will even out as its cleaned.

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Question: I have treated a pinewood floor with Softwood Lye, discolorations have appeared. What do I do?

 

You wait; lye is not a lacquer but a chemical treatment of the wood. During the process, which takes approximately 6-8 weeks, discolorations may appear, both yellow, orange and even greenish. But it will disappear again by itself. At the same time, if you wash the floor regularly with WOCA Natural Soap white, you expedite the process.

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